ARCHITECTURE

Xiqu Centre, Hong Kong

Bing Thom Architects + Ronald Lu & Partners has designed this world-class facility for the preservation, development and promotion of this important art form of Chinese cultural heritage in Hong Kong. The Xiqu Centre is one of the 17 core arts and cultural venues to be opened within the District. The venue provides a platform for the Xiqu (Chinese Opera) communities to interact, develop, produce the finest examples of Cantonese and other Chinese opera performances, attract new audiences, educate and collaborate with and host international cultural programmes.

Xiqu centre is located to provide a gateway of access to the Cultural District. Employing the Moongate traditional Chinese motif and a dynamic treatment of the facade, the building provides a striking entrance and a lantern for the District. Its flow or “qi” is expressed with curvilinear paths and forms. The architecture incorporates a generous amount of public leisure space, in addition to a Grand Theatre suspended high above the ground offering more than 1,000 seats, a Tea House Theatre with around 200 seats, a seminar hall with around 110 seats, learning spaces, eight rehearsal and practice rooms, and retail and dining facilities.

*In collaboration with Bing Thom Architects (currently named as Revery Architecture)

CIVIC & COMMUNITY

Xiqu Centre, Hong Kong

Bing Thom Architects + Ronald Lu & Partners has designed this world-class facility for the preservation, development and promotion of this important art form of Chinese cultural heritage in Hong Kong. The Xiqu Centre is one of the 17 core arts and cultural venues to be opened within the District. The venue provides a platform for the Xiqu (Chinese Opera) communities to interact, develop, produce the finest examples of Cantonese and other Chinese opera performances, attract new audiences, educate and collaborate with and host international cultural programmes.

Xiqu centre is located to provide a gateway of access to the Cultural District. Employing the Moongate traditional Chinese motif and a dynamic treatment of the facade, the building provides a striking entrance and a lantern for the District. Its flow or “qi” is expressed with curvilinear paths and forms. The architecture incorporates a generous amount of public leisure space, in addition to a Grand Theatre suspended high above the ground offering more than 1,000 seats, a Tea House Theatre with around 200 seats, a seminar hall with around 110 seats, learning spaces, eight rehearsal and practice rooms, and retail and dining facilities.

*In collaboration with Bing Thom Architects (currently named as Revery Architecture)